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Ambiguity is the property of being ambiguous, where a word, term, notation, sign, symbol, phrase, sentence, or any other form used for communication, is called ambiguous if it can be interpreted in more than one way. Ambiguity is distinct from vagueness, which arises when the boundaries of meaning are indistinct. Ambiguity is context-dependent: the same communication may be ambiguous in one context and unambiguous in another context. For a word, ambiguity typically refers to an unclear choice between different definitions as may be found in a dictionary. A sentence may be ambiguous due to different ways of parsing the same sequence of words.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambiguity


English

Noun
Singular
ambiguity
Plural
countable and uncountable; ambiguities

ambiguity (countable and uncountable; plural ambiguities)

1.(countable) Something liable to more than one interpretation, explanation or meaning, if that meaning etc cannot be determined from its context.
2.(uncountable) The state of being ambiguous.

Synonyms
(state of being ambiguous): ambiguousness, imprecision

Translations
something liable to more than one interpretation
Croatian: ambigvitet hr(hr) m.
Finnish: monitulkintaisuus, monimerkityksisyys, ambiguiteetti
French: ambiguïté fr(fr) f.
German: Ambiguität f., Doppeldeutigkeit f.
Portuguese: ambigüidade pt(pt) f.
Russian: двусмысленность, неясность
Spanish: ambigüedad es(es)
Turkish: Muğlâlık

Derived terms
ambiguous
Retrieved from
"
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ambiguity"

The etymology of the word Ambiguous:
1528, from Latin. ambiguus "having double meaning, shifting, changeable, doubtful," adj. derived from ambigere "to dispute about," lit. "to wander," from ambi- "about" + agere "drive, lead, act" (see act). Sir Thomas More (1528) seems to have first used it in Eng., but ambiguity (from L. ambiguitatem) is first recorded c.1400.

From the Online Etymology Dictionary

http://www.etymonline.com/